Product

dGTP BrilliantDye™ Terminator (v3.1) Cycle Sequencing kit (100 rxn)

SKU: BRDG3-100
Variants
BRDG3-100
€ 930,00
Variants
€ 930,00
Product Information

The dGTP BrilliantDye Cycle Sequencing Kit is optimized for sequencing through GT- and G-rich templates.

Format

The dGTP BrilliantDye Terminator Kit replaces dITP with dGTP, enabling you to read through difficult-to-sequence templates by reducing early signal loss.

Compatibility

Compatible with ABI genetic analyzers of the 310, 3100, 3130, 3500, 3730 and SeqStudio series.
Can be mixed with BrilliantDye v3.1 for optimal results.

Premium features
FAQ
Downloads
Premium features

Same high performance, but with greater value

Based on the trusted Sanger Chain Termination method
No need for changes in protocol, setting or calibration
Compatible with all ABI genetic analyzers
FAQ

How can we help to find the right answer for your question. If your question is not listed below, please use the contact form.

What is the difference between the different versions of BrilliantDye?

The BrilliantDye Terminator v1.1 Cycle sequencing kit is designed for specialty applications that require optimal basecalling adjacent to the primer.

The BrilliantDye Terminator v3.1. Cycle sequencing kit is the method of choice for longest reads.

For sequencing through G- and GT-rich templates, NimaGen offers the dGTP BrilliantDye kits, optimized for challenging sequence templates.

What can I do to sequence through a hairpin or secondairy structure?

- Use the BrilliantDye dGTP kit for the sequencing reaction. For optimal results it can be mixed with the default BrilliantDye kits to increase read lenghts.

- Add DMSO to a final 5% (v/v) concentration to the sequencing reaction.

- Incubate the reaction at 96C for 10 minutes before cycle sequencing.

How can I troubleshoot an issue with Sanger Sequencing?

A control primer (M13) and template (pGEM) are provided with each BrilliantDye kit. These can be run following the BrilliantDye protocol and can help you determine whether failed reactions are caused by poor template quality or sequencing reaction failure.